The cars that depreciate the most and the least in the Bay Area – SFGATE

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5. Acura RLX. The RLX is Acura’s luxury model, and while it’s super comfortable with a peppy V-6 and great mileage in the sport hybrid trim, its features are a step below its Jaguar, Mercedes and BMW competition. SF area depreciation over five years: 69.4 percent.
Average depreciation for all vehicles: 49.6 percent.
4. Chevrolet Volt. Chevy’s attempt at a Prius killer had mostly good reviews, but after nine years, the last one rolled off the line in February. The plug-in hybrid never really caught on with Chevy drivers, and competition from the company’s all-electric Bolt didn’t help either. The Volt’s 69.6 percent depreciation over five years in the Bay Area means you’re likely to find a used one at a considerable discount.
Average depreciation for all vehicles: 49.6 percent.
2. BMWi3. If you own one of these and looking to sell, don’t expect much. After five years, this electric Beemer loses 72.7 percent of its value in the Bay Area.
Average depreciation for all vehicles: 49.6 percent.
1. Nissan Leaf. Want a cheap used car for getting around town? Search Craigslist for a Leaf. No car depreciates more over five years in the San Francisco metro area than this EV — 73.9 percent on average, so you’re likely to find a bargain.
NEXT:  The least depreciating cars in the San Francisco metro area.
Average depreciation for all vehicles: 49.6 percent.
5. Jeep Wrangler Unlimited. Despite their not-so glowing repair record — especially after three years — Jeeps hold their value. The Unlimited depreciates 29.8 percent on average over five years in the Bay Area.
Average depreciation for all vehicles: 49.6 percent.
4. Subaru Impreza WRX. The WRX is a favorite in the Bay Area for its precision handling, turbo-charged performance and all-wheel drive. Subaru’s solid reputation for reliability doesn’t hurt either. Average Bay Area depreciation over five years: 29.8 percent.
Average depreciation for all vehicles: 49.6 percent.
2. Toyota Tundra: Madison Bumgarner may swear by the Ford F-150, but when it comes to full-size trucks that hold their value, the Tundra is second to none. And that’s despite a stiff ride and poor fuel economy. In the Bay Area, Tundras lose only 28.4 percent of their value on average over five years.
Average depreciation for all vehicles: 49.6 percent.
1. Jeep Wrangler. If you don’t mind the poor mileage, hard ride, noise and reliability issues, the Wrangler might be just the car for you, especially if you enjoy driving on rocks. Average Bay Area 5-year depreciation is 25 percent, markedly better than the national average of 31.5 percent.
NEXT: The cars most likely to cause buyer’s remorse in San Francisco.
Average depreciation for all vehicles: 49.6 percent.
Car models given up most often within the first year of ownership (national ranking), according to iSeeCars.com.
Car brands given up most often within the first year of ownership, according to iSeeCars.com.
Note: See the gallery for the cars in the San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose metro area that depreciate the most and the least.

For many car owners, when a car turns 5 years old, it’s time to find a new ride.
How much they get via trade-in or sale for that car depends on the mileage and condition, of course, but also on how well that model holds it value.
For example, the BMW 5 Series is an excellent midsize luxury automobile, rated No. 1 in its class by U.S. News & World Report. But if you bought this model new five years ago, it would now be worth less than one-third of its original value. On the other hand, a 5-year-old Porsche 911 coupe might fetch about two-thirds of its original purchase price.
Those depreciation figures come from the automotive research firm and car search engine iSeeCars.com, which analyzed more than 7.7 million new and used car sales to identify the models that depreciate the least and most after five years.
The analysis found that on the whole, electric vehicles and luxury vehicles suffer the most depreciation over five years. Because luxury vehicles carry such lofty prices when purchased new, the used price must fall dramatically to attract used car buyers.
Electric cars’ value declines steeply over five years for several reasons:
—Government incentives. Resale value is based on the lower post-incentive sticker price.
—Outdated technology, for example, an improved battery.
—Range anxiety, the fear that your battery will be inadequate for the distance of your trip.
The cars that depreciate the most in the U.S. after five years, according to automobile research company iSeeCars.com.
The buyer’s market for 5-year-old EV or EV/hybrids presents an opportunity for bargain hunters. A lightly used Chevy Volt, for example, might sell for tens of thousands of dollars less than its price new.
The best vehicles for retaining their value, according to iSeeCars, were Toyota trucks and Jeep Wranglers. The trucks are no surprise — Toyotas have long been highly regarded for their dependability.
But Jeeps haven’t. And yet no vehicle wards off depreciation better than the Wrangler.
RELATED: The cars most likely to cause buyer’s remorse in San Francisco
The red flags are numerous. The five-year-old 2015 Wrangler was rated by J.D. Power and Associates 29th out of 33 brands in dependability. Consumer Reports put the 2014 model (four recalls) at the top of its “worst value list.”
The stiff suspension, big wheels and high profile make for a harsh, herky-jerky ride, which is fine on a boulder field but not so great for a trip to the Safeway. Handling is clumsy. It can be very noisy on the freeway. Safety ratings haven’t been kind.
But people don’t care. Something about the Wrangler — the rugged descendant of the World War II Willy’s-Overland Jeep that can go anywhere —  captures the imagination.
The cars that depreciate the least in the U.S. after five years, according to automobile research company iSeeCars.com.

Mike Moffitt is an SFGATE Digital Reporter. Email: moffitt@sfgate.com. Twitter: @Mike_at_SFGate
Reporter Mike Moffitt has been writing and editing stories for newspapers and news websites for more than 25 years. Before joining the SFGate team, he worked at the San Francisco Examiner, Arizona Republic and Phoenix Gazette. He covers news, politics, science, sports, outdoors and Bay Area history.

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