DAILY MAIL COMMENT: So how will Channel migration be stopped? – Daily Mail

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Brexit was never intended to end immigration into this country. It was about reclaiming the power to decide who should and who should not be allowed to live here.
So reports that Liz Truss is to extend the visa system, allowing some key sectors of the economy to recruit more overseas workers, shouldn’t come as a great surprise.
In agriculture, for example, there has been a shortage of seasonal fruit and vegetable pickers. If those vacancies can’t be filled domestically, it makes sense to look abroad.
However, entry into this country cannot become a free-for-all, or the entire concept of taking back control is rendered a sham.
There have been endless pledges from politicians to stem this human tide but so far without even a glimmer of success. Migrants are seen being brought into Dover by Border Force earlier this month
The numbers are huge – more than 30,000 this year – placing impossible demands on local authorities and threatening to overwhelm some communities. Migrants are seen arriving on the beach at Folkestone earlier this month
Yet every day, hundreds of illegal migrants are crossing the Channel in small boats with little or no hindrance from the authorities. The vast majority are not seeking safety from persecution. What they want is work, housing, free healthcare and all the other benefits Britain offers.
The numbers are huge – more than 30,000 this year – placing impossible demands on local authorities and threatening to overwhelm some communities.
There have been endless pledges from politicians to stem this human tide but so far without even a glimmer of success.
As we report today, the Home Office believes challenges by Left-wing campaigners may leave the Rwanda scheme, under which asylum seekers would be sent to Africa while their claims were considered, in limbo for up to a year.
So what’s the alternative strategy? It must be quick and it must be effective. Faith in the system is crumbling. Without urgent action it will collapse altogether.
Asking Labour conference delegates to put down the Red Flag and pick up the Royal Standard was always going to be tricky. And so it proved yesterday.
After a short, awkward speech in praise of the late Queen, Sir Keir Starmer – who himself once advocated the abolition of the monarchy – asked the comrades to join a rendition of God Save the King.
Presumably worried they might not actually know it, party managers brought in a professional soprano to help them with the tune and handed round crib cards inscribed with the lyrics.
After a short, awkward speech in praise of the late Queen, Sir Keir Starmer – who himself once advocated the abolition of the monarchy – asked the comrades to join a rendition of God Save the King
Even then, this sudden burst of royalism was less than convincing. Indeed, some union delegates found they had more important things to do and stayed away.
If Sir Keir was hoping to rebut the charge that Labour is unpatriotic and riddled with class envy, he has a lot more work to do. One desultory verse of the National Anthem doesn’t quite cut it.
As Kwasi Kwarteng doubled down on his radical tax-cutting mission yesterday – promising more help soon for families – Labour’s response descended into confusion, with the party leader and his deputy singing from different hymn sheets.
Sir Keir said he would retain the 1p cut in the basic rate of income tax, while Angela Rayner (backed by Manchester mayor Andy Burnham), pledged to rescind it.
And this is not the only issue on which Labour’s two most senior figures resemble Doctor Dolittle’s pushmi-pullyu – joined at the hip but with two heads facing in opposite directions.
While Sir Keir is trying to distance his party from the ruinous campaign of coordinated union strikes, Miss Rayner is happily joining the picket line.
Labour is still two parties, one seeking to move closer to the centre after the humiliations of Corbynism, the other still unashamedly hard-Left.
Sir Keir has cobbled together a flimsy coalition of these opposing forces but the cracks are showing. The question is not whether it will fall apart – but when.
Published by Associated Newspapers Ltd
Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday & Metro Media Group

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